Phenylephrine: A placebo you don’t need

Interestingly, I have never found that Phenylephrine worked for me. So I always ask for Pseudoephedrine. Yes, I have to produce my drivers licence, but that is no big deal and the pharmacy staff seem to accept my anecdotal experience that Phenylephrine doesn’t work.

The Pediatric Insider

The Pediatric Insider

© 2015 Roy Benaroch, MD

Doctors, myself included, are dismissive of placebos. “That doesn’t work,” we say, referring to countless therapies that have no benefit over fake therapies (placebos), including pediatric chiropractic, homeopathy, and acupuncture.

We need to be honest. We have our placebos, too—pushed by modern pharmaceutical companies and genuine medical doctors. Maybe we ought to spend more time cleaning up what we do rather than pointing fingers at them.

Case in point: phenylephrine, marketed as a nasal decongestant. To understand how phenylephrine (PE) became so popular, we’ll have to go backwards a bit, to 1994, when the FDA published a list of nasal decongestant products that it considered safe and effective. Anything on “the list” could be sold without further FDA review. Included on that list were two oral decongestants: phenylephrine and pseudoephedrine (commonly known by the brand name Sudafed), which was…

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