Travel expenses are not ‘entitlements’

‘I hate the word entitlement’
– Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, 13 January 2017

During the recent political scandal about MPs claiming reimbursement for non-work related travel expenses, the media has mistakenly referred to travel expenses as ‘entitlements’, thus implying that they are some sort of ‘perk‘* of office.  This usage of the word ‘entitlement’ is irrational; and any argument that the reimbursement of legitimate work-related travel expenses is a perk is fallacious. It reveals a lexicological laziness on the part of journalists who pride themselves in being wordsmiths.

All employees have the right to be reimbursed for legitimate expenses incurred as a result of doing their job. Such reimbursements are not classified as income by the ATO, and they cannot logically be regarded as a ‘perk’ of office. On the contrary, if legitimate work expenses were not reimbursed, the employee would in effect be donating money to their employer.

Where such expenses are claimed for non-work related activities, they should not be reimbursed and if they have been reimbursed in error, they need to be repaid by the recipient. In this context, the use of the word ‘entitlement’ is doubly irrational.

Note:

*Cambridge Dictionary definition: An advantage or something extra, such as money or goods, that you are given because of your job e.g. ‘A company car and a mobile phone are some of the perks that come with the job’.

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1 Comment

Filed under Logical fallacies

One response to “Travel expenses are not ‘entitlements’

  1. Where non-work expenses are claimed, the claimer should be investigated for fraud (as Peter Slipper was). Being made to pay back only when you are ‘caught’ is an incentive to engage in fraud.

    Liked by 1 person

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